PostHeaderIcon How to Lower Your Alexa Rank

Alexa rankings (provided by Alexa.com, a site owned by Amazon.com) are one of the most common measures of a website’s popularity. The site measures popularity by counting visits from users who have the Alexa toolbar installed, and ranks websites according to the number of visits they get. While many agree that the method is flawed and shuns many important factors, it continues to play an important role in web marketing, dictating rates for such services as Review Me and Pay Per Post.

Website owners aim for a low Alexa rank, which means they’re high on the list of most popular websites. For the most part, this means getting more people to visit your site—or on a more technical note, getting Alexa to track more of these people. The Web offers dozens of ways to do this, although not all of them probably deserve merit. If you’re wondering how to lower your Alexa rank, here’s a look at some popular methods and how they can help.

Use social traffic: Try to get your content on Digg, StumbleUpon, and other social bookmarking sites. This will increase your site hits exponentially, and subsequently add to your readership. Another way to boost social traffic is to comment on other blogs yourself, particularly higher-ranking ones (programs like SEO Book can show you site rankings as you visit them). Choose sites and posts that are relevant to your own, and make sure to link back to your own site.

Get advertising: Investing in advertising is essential, even if you already have a strong reader base. Each advertising method brings something different to the mix, and not all of them are worth your money. Pay Per Click ads are a cheap but effective way to bring traffic. Advertising on big sites like Blogger and Webmaster will also work, but it’ll cost you a lot more—most people who do this are already making considerable amounts from traffic and just looking to cash in.

Install the toolbar: The logic is simple—since Alexa counts visits from people who have the toolbar, having it on your browser means your own visits will count. Your numbers move up every time you log in to comment or update. This may only help minimally, but much of Web marketing is like that—little tweaks adding up to give you that big boost. Note that the toolbar may have different names on different browsers.

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